Webinar Archive

Active IAFP Members can use our search below to find past webinars held by IAFP and IAFP’s Professional Development Groups (PDGs). Please note that all opinions and statements are those of the individual making the presentations and not necessarily the opinion or view of IAFP.

Webinar Access

You must have an active IAFP Membership to play the archived webinars in this section.

  • Low Water-Activity Series: Part 1of 4 - Persistent Strains and Source Tracking Principles in Low aw Food Processing Environments

    Several factors in low water-activity manufacturing environments can result in the creation of microbial niches. Environmental niches have been correlated with product contamination. Consequently, environmental monitoring programs are an important part of food safety programs in food manufacturing facilities. Effective programs will find problematic areas from time to time. Sometimes environmental contamination can be the result of a persistent strain of an organism. Persistent strains are commonly interpreted as a failure of environmental controls and are viewed by regulators as more serious than transient strains. The factors that cause these strains to persist in low-moisture environments and evade detection and controls will be discussed. The appropriateness of sub-typing approaches will also be discussed in context of what approaches should be used and when to consider using them.

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    Presenters

    • Jeffrey L. Kornacki, Presenter Kornacki Microbiology Solutions, USA
    • Joshua Gurtler, Moderator USDA-ARS, USA
  • Covid-19 Interruptions to Workforce Emphasize the Need for Automation in Microbial Testing Laboratories

    Microbial safety for manufactured products is of critical importance in the prevention of outbreaks and recalls. Microbial challenge testing is used to assess the effectiveness of GMP’s and products cannot be released until microbial testing has been completed. Skilled workers are commonly used to carry out microbial testing, but in times of uncertain skilled labor availability, the testing output will be impacted and may result in a product that can be shipped or is unsafe. Microbial testing automation not only reduces skilled labor requirements but also provides improved throughput and cost savings. The typical time needed to recoup investment costs is around 6-8 months. In addition, automation eliminates common mistakes that occur when completing a repetitive task. The objective of this presentation is to introduce a range of lab automation options available for a microbial testing laboratory and discuss the benefits of creating an uninterrupted workflow.

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    Presenters

    • Kelsey Lamb, Presenter University of Kentucky, USA
    • Teresa Blakley, Presenter Oklahoma State University, USA
    • Brady P. Carter, Moderator Neutec Group, USA
  • Data Science in the Food Industry

    Food Safety is one of the main challenges of the agri-food industry expected to be addressed in an environment of tremendous technological progress, where consumers’ lifestyles and preferences are in a constant state of flux. Food chain transparency and trust are drivers for food integrity control and also for improvements in efficiency and economic growth. Similarly, the circular economy has great potential to reduce wastage and improve the efficiency of operations in multi-stakeholder ecosystems. Throughout the food chain cycle, all food commodities are exposed to multiple hazards, resulting in a high likelihood of contamination. Such biological and/or chemical hazards may be naturally present at any stage of the food production, accidentally introduced or fraudulently imposed, putting at risk consumers’ health and their faith in the food industry. Nowadays, a massive amount of data is generated not only from the next-generation's monitoring food safety systems and along the entire food chain (primary production included), but also from IoT, media and other devices, which should be used for the benefit of society. The scientific discipline of "Data Science" should be considered as the vital player of driving forces to make this possible.

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    Presenters

    • George Nychas, Presenter Professor, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece
    • Panagiotis Skandamis, Moderator Researcher, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece